Posted tagged ‘Jackie Robinson’

Jayson Werth is a Washington National

December 5, 2010

In what has to be the most surprising news of the off-season, the Washington Nationals have signed Jayson Werth to a 7/$126mil contract. WOW.

This is totally out of nowhere. I really thought Werth would be headed to Detroit, Boston, or stay in Philly. If you recall, I had Werth worth about $99mil over five years. When I project it out further, I think he’ll be worth about $121mil over seven years. So the Nationals are overpaying a little bit. But not by much.

For Washington, I love the move, but hate the contract details. They are relatively close to contending so I like that they are trying to make a splash and bring in a quality player. It keeps the fans happy and makes the current team better as they wait for Strasburg to get healthy and Bryce Harper to develop. BUT, seven years is a long time. By the time the Nationals young talent is ready to aim for a playoff spot, Werth figures to be done as a high impact player. Once those days are over, he will be vastly overpaid for his talent and the contract will handcuff the franchise.

So I give the contract a C+ for the team. They do get better and bring excitement back to the ball club, but by binding themselves to Werth for so long, it could hinder their ability to make moves in the future, which is when they are going to want to make moves as their young talent will be ready for lift-off.Moreover, this seemingly takes them out of the running for Cliff Lee so it appears that FA battle will be a showdown between the Yankees and Rangers.

As for Werth…I’m surprised. I would have thought he would want to go to a team where he could win the World Series. Boston, Philly, or even Los Angeles and San Francisco. But money speaks and more importantly, I take it he likes the security of seven years. But where is the loyalty these days? Juan Uribe went to Los Angeles just weeks after winning in San Fran and now a Phillies favorite is going to a divisional foe. I remember the story of Jackie Robinson retiring because he was traded to the Giants from the Dodgers. Nowadays, players would welcome the trade with open arms.

 

Reconstructing the MLB Hall of Fame: Second base

August 25, 2010

Results are finally in!

IN:

Rogers Hornsby- 100%

Eddie Collins- 100%

Nap Lajoie- 100%

Joe Morgan- 100%

Charlie Gehringer- 100%

Frankie Frisch- 100%

Lou Whitaker- 100%

Roberto Alomar- 100%

Joe Gordon- 100%

Jackie Robinson- 100%

Bobby Grich- 87.5%

Craig Biggio- 87.5%

Ryne Sandberg- 87.5%

Bobby Doerr- 87.5%

Tony Lazzeri- 87.5%

Willie Randolph- 75%

NOT IN:

Jeff Kent- 50%

Cupid Childs- 50%

Johnny Evers- 37.5%

Billy Herman- 37.5%

Larry Doyle- 12.5%

Nellie Fox- 12.5%

Bid McPhee- 12.5%

Gil McDougald- 12.5%

Tony Phillips- 0%

Buddy Myer- 0%

Del Pratt- 0%

Miller Huggins- 0%

Red Schoendienst- 0%

Chuck Knoblauch- 0%

Bill Mazeroski- 0%

I’m liking Willie Randolph getting in. Also, YES! Grich, Whitaker are in the Hall of Fame! FINALLY! I am also surprised Sandberg and Grich were not 100%.

Players we kicked out: Johnny Evers, Nellie Fox, Billy Herman, Bill Mazeroski, Bid McPhee, and Red Schoendienst.

Players we voted in: Lou Whitaker, Roberto Alomar, Bobby Grich, Craig Biggio, and Willie Randolph.

Next up: third base

Top 100 players of all-time: 40-31

December 31, 2009

40. Hank Greenberg

.412/.605/.453/56.9

Greenberg was a power hitter who led the American League in home runs three times and had a total of 331 homers. Greenberg won the MVP twice and made the All-Star game five times.

39. Jackie Robinson

.409/.474/.412/63.0
Robinson is one of the most well known players of all-time. He broke the color barrier in Major League baseball in 1947 while on the Brooklyn Dodgers.He was constantly taunted and threatened on and off the field due to his race. He won the Rookie of the Year in 1947 and the MVP award in 1949. He made six All-Star games.

38. Johnny Bench

.342/.476/.361/71.2

On my list Bench is the second best catcher of all-time. He was known for his defense, power, and clutch ability in the playoffs. Bench was apart of those great 1970 Reds teams. He won the Rookie of the year and two MVP awards. He was a ten time Gold Glove winner and made the All-Star game fourteen times.

37. Yogi Berra

.348/.482/.370/61.6

Berra is my number one catcher. He won three MVP awards and won ten World Series titles with the Yankees. No other player won that many in Major League Baseball history. He was one of the earlier power hitting catchers. He had 358 home runs. Berra made fifteen All-Star games. Also who doesn’t love a good Yogi-ism?

36. Gaylord Perry

1.18/73.3 %/3.06/96.3

Perry was known for his sinking fastball. He was also caught greasing the ball once in his twenty-two seasons, but said he did it his entire career. Perry was the first to win the Cy Young in both leagues. Perry was a five time All-Star.

35. Cy Young

1.13/64.1 %/2.82/146.0

Cy Young seemed to never have a sore arm. He pitched over 800 games and 7000 innings during a twenty three year career. He finished with more wins, innings pitched, games started, and complete games than any other pitcher. He will probably hold all those records to the end of time because the way pitchers are handled nowadays. In 1901 he won the Triple Crown.

34. Nap Lajoie

.380/.467/.399/104.2

Nap Lajoie was possibly the best player in MLB before the coming of Ty Cobb. He is one of the best hitters in history with over 3,200 hits. He won the 1901 Triple Crown for hitters.

33. Cap Anson

.393/.445/.389/99.2

For the early era Anson was a power hitter. Though he had only hit ninety seven total home runs. He led his league in RBI’s eight times and won two batting titles. Anson had 3418 hits in his twenty seven years as a player.

32. Sandy Koufax

1.11/77.4 %/2.69/54.5

From 1962-1966 he won 111 games and led the league in ERA- it was under 2.00 runs per game. He also led the NL in strikeouts, shutouts, and pitched four no-hitters. Along with a perfect game in 1965 he won three Cy Young’s, three Triple Crowns, and one MVP. Koufax made six All-Star games.

31. Bob Gibson

1.19/75.7 %/2.89/85.6

Some say he is the best big-game pitcher of all-time. Gibson almost won two World Series for the Cardinals by himself. In 1968, he enjoyed one of the most dominating seasons in baseball history, posting a 1.12 ERA and winning twenty-two games. He won nine Gold Gloves, two Cy Youngs, and one MVP. Gibson was an eight time All-Star.