Posted tagged ‘Larry Walker’

2015 Hall of Fame Voting

January 5, 2015

My 2015 MLB Hall of Fame Ballot. Sorry for the typos and poor grammar- I’m writing this with my downtime at work.

1) Pedro Martinez

2827.1 IP, 10.04 K/9, 2.42 BB/9, 0.76 HR/9, 2.91 FIP, 87.1 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 11.9, 9.9, 8.6, 7.8, 7.8, 6.4, 5.8

6+ fWAR total: 16.4; fWAR/200IP: 6.16

His average season was MVP quality. 1999 may have been the best pitching season ever. In the AL East. During the highest run scoring era in baseball history. Yeah, this is a no-doubter.

2) Randy Johnson

4135.1 IP, 10.61 K/9, 3.26 BB/9, 0.89 HR/9, 3.19 FIP, 111.7 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 10.4, 9.6, 9.5, 9.5, 9.5, 8, 7.7

6+ fWAR total: 22.2; fWAR/200IP: 5.40

I think his seven best fWAR seasons speak for his dominance. Another no-doubter.

3) Curt Schilling

3261 IP, 8.60 K/9, 1.96 BB/9, 0.96 HR/9, 3.23 FIP, 83.2 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 9.3, 8.4, 8.3, 7.4, 7.3, 5.7, 5.4

6+ fWAR total: 10.7; fWAR/200IP: 5.10

If his regular season numbers aren’t impressive enough, then his postseason stats give him bonus points that make him a HOF pitcher.

4) Mike Mussina

3562.2 IP, 7.11 K/9, 1.98 BB/9, 0.95 HR/9, 3.57 FIP, 82.5 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 6.9, 6.2, 6.2, 5.8, 5.4, 5.3, 5.3

6+ fWAR total: 1.3; fWAR/200IP: 4.63

His peak seasons weren’t on the same level of RJ or Pedro, but he was consistently an MVP level pitcher with 10 seasons of 5+ fWAR. That’s good enough for me, especially for another SP who had to deal with the AL East during the game’s biggest offensive era.

5) John Smoltz

3473 IP, 7.99 K/9, 2.62 BB/9, 0.75 HR/9, 3.24 FIP, 78.7 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 8.2, 6.7, 5.4, 5.2, 5.2, 5.1, 5.1

6+ fWAR total: 2.9; fWAR/200IP: 4.53

Starting Pitcher fWAR/200IP: 4.41; Relief Pitcher fWAR/200IP: 5.94

Pitched at an All-Star/MVP level as both a starter and reliever. He is close to borderline for me, but was good enough that I feel comfortable voting him in.

6) Mike Piazza

7745 PA, 427 HR, .308/.377/.545/.390/140+, 20.7 defensive runs, 63.5 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 9.1, 7.4, 6.6, 6.6, 6, 5.8, 4.6

6+ fWAR total: 5.7; fWAR/650PA: 5.33

Best hitter all-time at a position? Hall of Famer for sure.

7) Jeff Bagwell

9431 PA, 449 HR, .297/.394/.588/.415/157+, -138.5 defensive runs, 80.2 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 8, 7.8, 7.8, 7.7, 6.7, 5.9, 5.5

6+ fWAR total: 8.9; fWAR/650PA: 5.53

Another player whose average season was MVP quality. No doubter for a guy with similar career to Frank Thomas, a first ballot Hall of Famer.

8) Edgar Martinez

8672 PA, 309 HR, .312/.418/.515/.405/149+, -87.1 defensive runs, 65.6 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 7, 6.1, 6, 5.9, 5.7, 5.5, 5.5

6+ fWAR total: 1.1; fWAR/650PA: 4.92

Much like Piazza is the best offensive catcher ever, Martinez has been the best DH ever. Now, he didn’t play defense and that hurts him. But he was so good offensively, it doesn’t matter. Retiring with a .300+/.400+/.500+ line, even in the context of his era, is incredible. He is like the Mussina of hitters in this class. Consistently great even if he doesn’t have one “all-time” type of season.

9) Tim Raines

10359 PA, 170 HR, 808 SB (85%), .294/.385/.425/.361/125+, -109.6 defensive runs, 66.4 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 7.2, 6.7, 6.7, 6, 6, 5.5, 3.9

6+ fWAR total: 2.6; fWAR/650PA: 4.17

Raines is the SABR darling of this HOF class (along with Alan Trammell). Upon further review, he is closer to the outside looking in than I originally thought. However, a lot of lower fWAR/650PA is due to the fact he probably did stick around too long. But Raines is the best base stealer/runner of all-time. Rickey Henderson stole more bases, but at lower clip (80% compared to Raines’ 85%). Stealing bases at an 85% clip for a whole career, and to steal that many is amazing. Raines is 5th all-time among SB leaders, and has the highest of SB% of the top five. And base stealing is just one aspect of his game- he was also an OBP machine!

10) Larry Walker

8030 PA, 383 HR, 230 SB, .313/.400/.565/.412/140+, 3.5 defensive runs, 68.9 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 9.1, 7.6, 5.3, 5.3, 5, 4.7, 4.7

6+ fWAR seasons: 4.7; fWAR/650PA: 5.58

Larry Walker is has knock against him and it’s not Coors Field. It’s his injury history. Yes, he played in the best hitters park in the best hitters era. But his numbers were still far and away better than most of his peers. His home/road splits are drastic- but only because while he was amazing the road he was god-like at home. His per season fWAR totals might seem low but again, that’s due to injury-plagued seasons and this is supported by his MVP level career fWAR/650PA of 5.58. Dude is a Hall of Famer.

Now, I think there are more deserving players. However, a ballot only allows for ten votes. Therefore, I withheld all players who definitely used PED’s and were not just suspected of PED’s. Unlike most people, I don’t care about PED’s when it comes to the HOF. However, on a crowded ballot I won’t put them ahead of other deserving players. Therefore, the rest of eligible players I think are Hall worthy are…

Roger Clemens

4916.2 IP, 8.55 K/9, 2.89 BB/9, 0.66 HR/9, 3.09 FIP, 139.5 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 10.8, 9.7, 9.1, 9, 8.5, 8.5, 8.1

6+ fWAR total: 21.7; fWAR/200IP: 5.68

Most evidence points toward his first PED use being in 1997 with Toronto. If you look at his fWAR before that during his Boston tenure, he had 83 fWAR or 5.71 fWAR per season in nearly 3000 total innings. Hall of Famer.

Barry Bonds

12606 PA, 762 HR, 514 SB, .298/.444/.607/.435/173+, 67.6 defensive runs, 164 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 12.5, 12.4, 11.6, 10.5, 10.1, 9.9, 9.6

6+ fWAR total: 34.6; fWAR/650PA: 8.46

Best player of all-time not named Ruth- and that’s only because Ruth was also a good pitcher. HOF’er before he started using in 1999.

Mark McGwire

7660 PA, 583 HR, .263/.394/.588/.415/157+, -138.5, 66.3 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 8.5, 7.3, 6.3, 6, 5.7, 5.4, 5.1

6+ fWAR total: 4.1; fWAR/650PA: 5.63

I feel the worst about voting for McGwire because he used almost his entire career, if not his whole career, while Bonds and Clemens had HOF careers before their steroid use. But boy, could he hit.

And the following are guys that I am indecisive on- one minute I think they’re in and the next I don’t.

Craig Biggio

12503 PA, 291 HR, 414 SB, .281/.363/.433/.352/115+, -23 defensive runs, 65.1 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 9.3, 6.5, 6.2, 4.9, 4.8, 4.7, 4.5

6+ fWAR total: 4; fWAR/650PA: 3.38

Biggio is tough. He does have 3000 hits. He does have some superb seasons. But the more I think about him the more I think he was simply a good, All-Star caliber player who had a long career that allowed him to get his 3000 hits. A 3.38 fWAR/650PA is not HOF worthy. But if he retired before he wasn’t good anymore, that number would be better. So for now, I will keep him off the ballot until I can make my mind up either way.

Alan Trammell

9375 PA, 185 HR, 236 SB, .285/.352/.415/.343/111+, 184.4 defensive runs, 63.7 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 7.7, 6.9, 6.2, 5.7, 5.6, 5.3, 4.3

6+ fWAR total: 2.8′ fWAR/650PA: 4.42

Trammell is one of the game’s great fielding shortstops. He is a HOF worthy defender. Offensively, his numbers don’t look great. But in context of the era, he has really good numbers for a SS and was one of the game’s first great two-way players at that position. A 4.42 fWAR/650PA isn’t ideal for the HOF, but if you take away his first couple seasons and last couple seasons to focus truly on his prime playing days, and that number looks a whole lot better. If it wasn’t a crowded ballot I would vote for him, but that’s not the case. And a result, he only has a couple years left on the ballot and I fear the worst for him.

Nomar Garciaparra

6116 PA, 229 HR, .313/.361/.521/.376/124+, 18.8 defensive runs, 41.5 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 7.6, 7.3, 6.4, 6.3, 5.7, 4.8, 2.2

6+ fWAR total: 3.6; fWAR/650PA: 4.41

During his peak, Nomar was arguably the best shortstop in baseball- ahead of A-Rod and Jeter. But how much does a peak count. Clearly, he had HOF talent. The only reason he isn’t a legitimate candidate is because he often hurt and it ruined his ability perform well, and put up good full season numbers when he was at his best. I don’t think I’d ever vote for him, but I want his career to recognition.

Gary Sheffield

10947 PA, 509 HR, 253 SB, .292/.393/.514/.391/141+, -300.9 defensive runs, 62.4 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 7.5, 6.6, 6.5, 6.5, 4.9, 4.6, 3.8

6+ fWAR total: 3.1; fWAR/650PA: 3.71

Again, the average fWAR is low- but he played for a really long time. Plus, Sheffield could hit. Like really hit. He lost 30 wins(!) due to crappy defense and still had 62.4 career fWAR. So that begs the question- should I punish him for being so bad on defense? Or should I recognize him as a phenomenal hitter?

Brian Giles

7836 PA, 287 HR, .291/.400/.502/.388/136+, -80.8 defensive runs, 54.5 fWAR

7 Best fWAR seasons: 6.7, 6.7, 6.3, 5.7, 5.5, 4.8, 4.3

6+ fWAR total: 1.7; fWAR/650PA: 4.52

Giles was a consistent offensive force if he never did have that one above and beyond season like a Larry Walker. But he finished with a career OBP of .400 and SLG over .500. That’s really good. His average fWAR season is also borderline for me. The one thing keeping me from voting for him is a short peak. If he had sustained his prime longer and not simply had a bunch of All-Star level seasons instead of MVP seasons, he would have got my vote.

Lee Smith

1289.1 IP, 8.73 K/9, 3.39 BB/9, 0.62 HR/9, 2.93 FIP, 27.3 fWAR, fWAR/200IP: 4.24

I don’t think Lee Smith is quite a HOF’er. He’s better than I thought, but I wouldn’t put him in. However, if you compare him to other RP in the Hall, he is better. He is better than both Rollie Fingers and Bruce Sutter and on par with Trevor Hoffman, who most likely will be in the Hall of Fame. However, I don’t think the above should be in the Hall which makes this a tough vote. Put him in because inferior pitchers are in, or vote him out because he should be out.

 

This is just all my opinion folks (which is generally right) and if there’s one takeaway it’s this: what a class this is!

BBWAA screws up again

January 6, 2011

Another ballot, another mediots post. I am making this post separate from the previous one since I don’t want to ruin my congratulatory post with BBWAA nonsense.

This has to be one of the worse ballots in recent BBWAA history.

1) I will NOT give them credit for Alomar and Blyleven. Both were just a couple votes away from making it. Both were shoe-ins.

2) How does Kevin Brown fall off the ballot? Whether you believe he is a HOF’er or not, he has a case and thus is deserving of more time on the ballot. Juan Gonzalez will live to see another ballot but not K-Brown? Pathetic.

3) Edgar Martinez dropped in percentage points. How does that happen? You would think over time he would get support as people realize he put up godly numbers and they would relax on the DH thing. Guess not.

4) Larry Walker at 20%? Unlike some other deserving people on the ballot, I think Walker will get in at some point. But 20% is awfully. His % practically confirms my belief the majority of voters don’t care and don’t look at the numbers.

5) I give up. Trammell will never get 😦

6) No words need to be said on Bagwell. He clearly is one of the best first baseman EVER. But made up rumors are keeping him out. The BBWAA makes a mockery of professional journalism yet again.

 

At least Tim Raines gained support. I never thought I’d say this, but he might have a chance going forward. Today on MLBN, even someone like Mitch Williams gave him support- and even said he was the Rickey Henderson of the NL. Finally some mediot understands!

Also, I can almost guarantee Barry Larkin gets in next ballot. He jumped into the 60% range and the newcomers to the next ballot are weak. Larkin can jump 13% in support. I will not blame them for Mark McGwire. It’s a touchy subject and I can understand why he still gets no support.

My 2011 Hall of Fame ballot

December 22, 2010

Going off what The Yankee U did earlier today, I will be posting my hypothetical Hall of Fame ballot. Obviously I don’t have a vote, but if I did this is what my ballot would look like (in no order)

1. Bert Blyleven (4970 IP, 3.19 FIP, 87.6 rWAR)

Can we give the man his due, BBWAA? He was an extremely consistent, durable, and GOOD pitcher for a LONG time. If that is not Hall of Fame worthy than I don’t know what is.

2. Roberto Alomar (10400 PA, .300/.371/.443/.365/125 and 68.2 fWAR)

He just missed the 75% mark last year so I strongly believe he gets in this year and deservedly so. He was a phenomenal hitter for a second baseman and could bring it with the glove.

3. Barry Larkin (9057 PA, .295/.371/.444/.366/124 and a 69.8 fWAR)

Larkin is a contemporary of Alomar and arguably a better play than Alomar was. Barry was one of the first shortstops to the revolutionize the offensive side of the position, was a great fielder, and had seasons that were above the 6 WAR MVP threshold.

4. Edgar Martinez (8672 PA, .312/.418/.515/.405/151 and a 71.6 fWAR)

He only got 36.2% of the vote last year which is quite pathetic. And you know it’s because he was a DH. The BBWAA recognizes he was an all-time great hitter, but because he only “played half the game” they are gonna penalize him which is bullshit. The fact is, he was a .300 hitter, .400 OBP guy, and .500 power guy. That is exceptional. Moreover, despite being a DH and incurring a large positional penalty, he still accumulated an fWAR over 70. The man is a Hall of Famer.

5. Tim Raines (10359 PA, .294/.385/.425/.374/137 and a 71.0 fWAR)

Tim Raines is the poster boy for SABR-heads everywhere. The BBWAA shoots him down since he lacked power, was overshadowed by Rickey Henderson, and was a part-time player by the time he retired. But he was an on-base god in his prime. Moreover, he was arguably the best base stealer of all-time as he not only stole a high volume of bases (808) but did so at a super efficient rate (85%). He may never be voted into the Hall of Fame, which truly would be a shame.

6. Mark McGwire (7660 PA, .263/.394/.588/.415/161 and a 70.6 fWAR)

The only reason and I mean ONLY reason for leaving him out of the Hall is the whole steroids issue. When it comes to his on-field production, there is no way around the fact he is a Hall of Famer. I mean, just look at the stat line I posted.

7. Alan Trammell (9375 PA, .285/.352/.415/.434/115 and a 69.5 fWAR)

Trammell is another player who will probably never be recognized by the BBWAA. Why? Because they don’t understand context. Nowadays his offensive numbers don’t seem so great but during the era he played in, for a shortstop, those were some crazy good numbers. He was Cal Ripken before Cal Ripken. Also, the MSM fails to properly weight defense and Trammell was a defensive whiz. He and Lou Whitaker were arguably the best DP tandem in baseball history and yet neither is in the Hall of Fame. Something is wrong with that picture.

8. Jeff Bagwell (9431 PA, .297/.408/.540/.406/152 and an 83.9 fWAR)

Yeah, this one is a no-doubter. Bagwell is one of the best players of his generation and one of the best first baseman of all-time. Not even the BBWAA can screw this one up.

9. Larry Walker (8030 PA, .313/.400/.565/.414/145 and a 72.2 fWAR)

Walker should be another no-doubter. Yes, his offensive numbers were aided by Coors Field. BUT he put up great numbers before he got to Colorado, so he wasn’t just a product of Coors Field. Moreover, he was a remarkable defensive player. He was a career .300/.400/.500 guy which is quite impressive.

10. Kevin Brown (3256 IP, 3.33 FIP, 77.2 fWAR)

K-Brown is just the second pitcher on my ballot and a kind of close call for me. Dominant may not be the first word that comes to mind when you think of him, but that’s because, like Mike Mussina, he was overshadowed by other dominant pitchers such as Pedro Martinez and Randy Johnson. The fact remains that Brown has a phenomenal ERA, FIP, and xFIP. His 77.2 fWAR is well above the Hall of Fame threshold and he had 7 MVP-esque seasons according to WAR. He is a Hall of Famer in my book.

 

So I used up all ten spots, but that’s okay since there was no one else I wanted to elect. If only the BBWAA could read this.

Top 100 players of all-time: 90-81

December 4, 2009

YC picks up where he left off

90. Roy Campanella
.360/.500/.38536.3

Campanella was a three time MVP, (1951, 1953, and 1955) and had good power for a catcher. He hit 242 career home runs. He made eight All-Star appearances and led the Dodgers to five pennants while winning one World Series title.

89. Mariano Rivera
1.01/80.1 %/2.78/46.8
The G.O.A.T. in the closer role and the only closing pitching on this list is the great Mariano Rivera. Rivera is still playing today and will be the last man to wear number 42. He may not own the saves record, but the man does his job. Rivera’s career ERA is 2.25. Also known for his clutch playoff pitching, Mo has the most saves and lowest ERA in post season history. (39 and 0.74).

88. Bob Feller
1.32/74.0 %/3.48/66.0

Feller posted a 3.25 ERA in his twenty years as a professional ballplayer. He had twelve one hitters and set a record for strikeouts in a season with 348 in 1946. Feller also won the Pitching Triple Crown in 1940. He was an eight time All-Star as well. Feller accumulated 2581 strikeouts over his career.

87. Harmon Killebrew
.376/.509/.389/61.2

A true power hitter, Killebrew spent his first four seasons on the bench before bursting on the scene with 42 home runs in 1959. Killebrew went on to hit forty home runs in a season seven more times. Killer was the 1969 AL MVP and was sent to eleven All-Star games. He is apart of the 500 HR and 2,000 hit clubs. (573 homers, 2,086 hits)

86. Steve Carlton

1.25/74.1 %/3.15/84.4

Carlton was a four time Cy Young winner, one time Triple Crown winner, and a one time
Gold Glove winner. He too was a strikeout pitcher and held the strikeout career record until Nolan Ryan broke it. Carlton also made ten All-Star game appearances. He also won 329 games in his career.

85. Al Simmons

.380/.535/.409/63.5

In each of his first eleven seasons Simmons drove in over 100 runs. Simmons was one of the best hitting OF’s during the 20’s and 30’s. He was a three-time All-Star and he was 73 hits shy from 3000. Simmons had a final career batting average of .334.

84. Willie McCovey
.374/.515/.388/65.1

McCovey had a cove named after him outside AT&T Park. He and teammate Willie Mays formed a powerful duo. Willie McCovey was elected to the Hall in his first season of eligibility in 1986 . He was the 1959 ROY and the 1969 MVP. He was also six time All-Star. His main strength was his power. He hit 521 long balls over his career.

83. Ozzie Smith
.337/.328/.311/64.7

Smith is one of the Cardinals most known ballplayers. The Wizard of Oz had many acrobatic moves in the infield. Smith won thirteen straight Gold Glove awards and he was a sixteen time All-Star. His strength was his defense. He had great range and and is perhaps the greatest defensive player at any position in the history of baseball.

82. Larry Walker

.400/.565/.414/67.1

Walker was a product of Colorado’s perfect hitters park. In 1997 he hit .366 with a .452 OBP, 208 hits, 143 runs, 46 doubles, 49 home runs, 130 RBI, and 33 stolen bases.  He also was won seven Gold Gloves and had five All-Star game appearances. Walker was a fine defensive player who had range and a strong arm.

81. Jim Thome

.404/.557/.406/65.7

Thome is yet another great power hitter on my list. I think he has one of the best strokes in the game. For eleven straight seasons Thome hit at least twenty home runs. Like most power hitters he was either going to walk, strike out, or hit a home run. Thome is a four time All-Star. Thome has hit 541 home runs.

Hall of Fame or no Hall of Fame, that is the question

November 9, 2009

I’ve been reading Tom Tango lately, and recently he’s talked about a trick or shortcut in determing if someone is worthy of the HOF. So he’s an extended quote:

As I’ve talked about in the past, the best way to get a sense of someone’s place in history is to compare the player to his peers.  And typically, you get about 20-25 players elected to the Hall of Fame for every decade of birth years (with about one-third of those pitchers).  Seeing that the best of the new crop of eligible players were born between 1963-68, I decided to list the best players born between 1961-1970.  Here are the best non-pitchers, in alphabetical order, by position class (all have at least 50 WAR according to baseballprojection.com):

WAR born retroID player

Catchers:
59 1968 piazm001 Piazza Mike

Infielders (2B, SS, 3B):
64 1968 alomr001 Alomar Roberto
66 1965 biggc001 Biggio Craig
59 1968 kentj001 Kent Jeff
69 1964 larkb001 Larkin Barry
56 1967 ventr001 Ventura Robin

Outfielders:
172 1964 bondb001 Bonds Barry
67 1970 edmoj001 Edmonds Jim
80 1969 grifk002 Griffey Ken
65 1967 loftk001 Lofton Kenny
64 1968 shefg001 Sheffield Gary
60 1968 sosas001 Sosa Sammy
67 1966 walkl001 Walker Larry

Firstbasemen/DH:
80 1968 bagwj001 Bagwell Jeff
58 1964 clarw001 Clark Will
67 1963 marte001 Martinez Edgar
51 1963 mcgrf001 McGriff Fred
63 1963 mcgwm001 McGwire Mark
57 1968 olerj001 Olerud John
66 1964 palmr001 Palmeiro Rafael
76 1968 thomf001 Thomas Frank
66 1970 thomj002 Thome Jim

How many of those should (or will) make the Hall of Fame (based on your criteria, or those of the Holy Writers)?  If we look at every 10yr birth class, the high was the 36 players born from 1898-1907.  The low was the 13 players born 1924-1933.  More recently, there were 21 players born 1938-1947 elected to the HOF.  It’s fair to say that every ten year birth class should have somewhere between 20-25 players, more or less, with about 30% of them being pitchers, more or less.  So, somewhere around 15 non-pitchers.  The above list contains 22 non-pitchers.

If you can knock off about 7 players, the rest are likely to make the Hall of Fame.  Is there anyone out there that is knocking out Alomar or Larkin?  And how many of you are knocking out Edgar from the above list (and if you are, how many players are you left with)?  Fred McGriff would seem to me to be the cusp-player.

UPDATE: Here are the best pitchers:


born WAR retroID player
1962 128 clemr001 Clemens Roger
1963 92 johnr005 Johnson Randy
1966 97 maddg002 Maddux Greg

1965 65 browk001 Brown Kevin
1966 67 glavt001 Glavine Tom
1968 75 mussm001 Mussina Mike
1966 70 schic002 Schilling Curt
1967 65 smolj001 Smoltz John

1967 50 appik001 Appier Kevin
1963 58 coned001 Cone David
1962 55 finlc001 Finley Chuck
1964 48 goodd001 Gooden Dwight
1961 46 key-j001 Key Jimmy
1962 47 moyej001 Moyer Jamie
1964 47 rogek001 Rogers Kenny
1964 55 sabeb001 Saberhagen Bret
1963 51 welld001 Wells David

1969 47 rivem002 Rivera Mariano

So who am I leaving off?

Jeff Kent, Will Clark, Fred McGriff, John Olerud, Sammy Sosa, Gary Sheffield, and Robin Ventura. For the pitchers its Kevin Appier, David Cone, Chuck Finley, Dwight Gooden, Jimmy Key, Jamie Moyer, Kenny Rogers, Brett Saberhagen, and David Wells.

I just want to say what an amazing generation of players. This will probably go down as the best HOF generation in baseball history’s. To have this many great pitchers and hitters grouped into one generation at a single time is amazing. Steroids? Sure, but that shouldn’t tarnish the general amazingness of the generation.